Five Ways to Poise Customer Service for the Future



It’s Monday and the first day of Customer Service Week. Let’s begin by setting goals for a long-term strategy to make sure that customer service is one of your company’s competitive differentiators.

I think it’s a fair estimate that a typical customer service representative handles more than 10,000 calls a year. That’s 10,000 interactions, 10,000 opportunities to positively influence the customers’ loyalty toward the brand and the company. There is no other department so uniquely positioned to achieve this goal. The Customer Service Department must take its place on the C Suite level to have the greatest impact.

 Here are five ways Customer Service can demonstrate its value and be a top rung in the organization’s ladder. 

1. Turnover in Customer Service is extremely high. According to Forrester’s analyst, Kate Leggett, having less than a 20 percent turnover for call centers is considered good, with some experiencing over 100 percent. As issues become more complicated and communication instantaneous, organizations must have agents who are competent and well trained with comprehensive information about your company’s products and services.  By definition, this requires longevity.  Representatives should be appreciated and compensated for their expertise. It’s important to include representatives in the decision making process.  They are an integral part of the bottom line profitability.

2. Stakeholders are critical to Customer Service.  Many departments within a company rely on Customer Service to support them with information not easily obtained otherwise. Consider getting feedback from stakeholders to assess their satisfaction levels. Discover additional services that Customer Service can provide to stakeholders to further support their functions. This will result in additional exposure and help secure supplemental budgets for personnel, training and technology.

3. Customers demand a personalized experience. There are new innovations in technology almost daily and multiple products and services from which to choose. Delivering a unique customer experience becomes even more crucial.  Hiring customer service agents with specific skill sets and providing ongoing training is mandatory.  The customer service representative must have the necessary tools to accommodate an individual’s specific needs and requirements.



4. Executives need to walk the talk. Posting letters from C-Level executives highlighting the importance of Customer Service doesn’t mean anything.  Company executives should spend at least a half of a day a year responding to telephone and email inquiries. Feedback should be provided about what they learned from the experience and the processes.  Sending wave files of selected calls won’t achieve the same goal.

5. It’s more than just putting an empty chair in your meetings. Jeff Bezos, from Amazon, placed an empty chair at all meetings; that represented the ”customer.”  This was to keep in the forefront that the customer is central and what would they think of any new ideas suggested.  But is that sufficient?  The person or team in charge of Customer Service should also be in those meetings. That department has the direct connection to the customer. An empty chair can’t talk. Customer Service has its finger on the pulse of what customers want.

Bottom line:  Customer Service is responsible for customers, a company’s most important asset.  Let’s celebrate Customer Service Week by acknowledging both the customer and those who represent them and make sure we give representatives the tools, authority an recognition they well deserve.

Article Source :-Five Ways to Poise Customer Service for the Future

About the author:  Richard Saporito is a NYC Restaurant Insider with more than 30 years experience.  He is currently the President of Topserve Restaurant Consulting, Inc. and the author of “How To Improve Dining Room Service.”  Discover how to improve your restaurant’s dining room service and dramatically increase your profits here:

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This book says everything I have always believed. Its not only the Chef that makes a restaurant successful. The wait staff is also important. Most successful restaurants all have one thing in common…
They provide customer service which exceeds their customer’s expectations!

From the statistics below you will see why its so important
Well, consider these statistics from the White House Office of Consumer Affairs in
Washington, DC…
For every complaint you’re aware of, there are 26 additional customers who
have unresolved problems or complaints…

A dissatisfied customer will tell 9 to 15 people about their displeasure and
sometimes they will tell as many as 20.

On the other hand, this same group also found…
Up to 96% of customers would do business with you again if they felt you acted
quickly and to their satisfaction and many said they would refer other people.

On average, happy customers will tell 4-6 people about their positive experience.

The Fact Is…
Businesses that provide extraordinary customer service can improve their
profitability, increase market share and will have customers who are willing to pay
more for their products and services simply because of the extraordinary service
they receive.

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4 Things to Consider in a Good design and Layout Plan for a Restaurant



How to Start a RestaurantA successful restaurant will need a good design and layout plan. Design and layout plans are dependent on different factors which will influence the final decisions later on.

In fact, the output of the layout plans can definitely affect the success of the restaurant. People often go to a new restaurant and they think to themselves “they should have put that plant elsewhere, it obstructs the good view” or “I wish they hadn’t put too much light in here.” These are small things which can really add up and end up influencing the customers to go to the other side of the street where another restaurant is calling out to their taste buds. Here are the 4 things to consider:

• Density of customers

The layout plan should be based mostly on the comfort of the patrons. Even fast food restaurants consider the density of people, especially in peak hours, even though it may seem that these restaurants become too crowded during lunch time.

For formal dining restaurants which cater to the upper class income, it may be wise to provide more space between the tables since these restaurants don’t really rely on the number of people per day. Their revenues depend on the pricing of the food items. There should be more provision for eye candy such as furniture and art works.

• Style of service

The layout and floor plans should also be based on the type of service that the restaurant will give. Fast food restaurants and self-service restaurants would need less distance between the tables since the food won’t be served there. For other restaurants which provide table service, the space between the tables is very important so as to prevent too much clutter from happening in a specific part of the restaurant.

• Type of building

The layout plan is restricted by the type of structure where the restaurant will be built. You should be able to take into consideration all the different curves and the minor details in the structure before proceeding.

• Lighting

Proper lighting is very important for every restaurant. The lighting should be able to match the mood and the type of service of the restaurant. A relaxed atmosphere can be complemented by bright lighting while serene and serious moods can be accompanied by subtler shades.

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Ray Freeman is the author of “How To Start A Restaurant Business Following A Profitable System”. If you would like to learn more about this topic, please visit:

www.how-to-start-a-restaurant.com

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