F&B Article :- What Customers Don’t Like About Your Restaurant

Licence by Creative Commons

Licence by Creative Commons

You may have the tastiest food in town, but you don’t see repeat business. Customers go out your door praising your food but you never see them come back. Business start dropping. You spend tons of money on advertising, but you still never get repeat business. You wonder whats wrong. Could it be the menu. You change the menu but still business doesn’t come. This the senario in most failing restaurants. The owners think that its all because of the food. But there are other reasons why guest don’t return to your restaurant. RestaurantNews.com has an article on what customers don’t like about your restaurant. This could be one of the factors why your customers are not returning.
Below is an exceprt from the article, if you would like to know please click on the link.



What Customers Don’t Like About Your Restaurant

If you asked your loyal customers what they love about your restaurant, they’d probably have a long list of likes. But what about the customers who don’t like your restaurant? The ones who have a bad experience and never come back? Since you don’t have the chance to ask them what went wrong, read over this list of seven common restaurant turn offs. Are you guilty of any of these offenses? If so, you might be turning customers away!

1. Bad smells.

Customers want to smell delicious things coming from your kitchen. These are the smells that make them anticipate your food. However, they definitelydon’t want to smell cleaning fluids, burned food, old fish, or your bathrooms.

Read more here What Customers Don’t Like About Your Restaurant

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10 Customer Service Tips for 2015 – CRM Magazine

Focus on the human element to inspire your employees

By Jonathan Gale

As January rolls around again, it’s time to reflect on the highs and lows of the last 12 months and plan for the year ahead.

Whatever happened in 2014, think of 2015 as a clean slate—a new, shiny, fresh-out-of-the-box year, which you can make your own. Here are 10 customer service tips to ensure that you—and your customers—have a happy new year.

1. Aim to inspire.

You don’t have to be Superman to inspire; you just need to make your staff feel valued and demonstrate that you appreciate the value of their work.

Unsurprisingly, most workers aren’t motivated by the thought of the company’s shareholders making more money, so simply showing your team an upward profit margin on a graph is hardly inspirational.

Instead, consider the value of what you give your customers. Whether it’s that the product or service your company sells has had a real impact on their life or just that your excellent service has made their day, it’s the human element that is really going to motivate your workforce.

2. Ensure goals are attainable.

You could set 20 goals for your team this year, but if only a few of them are realistic, you’ll create a demoralizing work environment.

Research published in the Harvard Business Review shows how to strike the right balance. The study, conducted by a team at Florida State University, demonstrates that setting a goal that is a range, rather than a specific number, has a huge impact on whether the goal is met.

The research looked at weight loss groups, and found that asking people to lose between one and three pounds per week was more effective than asking them to lose two pounds.

This works because the range makes the goal seem more attainable, but the option of achieving more adds an element of challenge. The same principle can easily be applied to call center targets.

3. Find the right bottom line.

Along with employee- or team-specific goals, you need to establish a customer service ethos that acts as a bottom line for what’s expected from your team.

This should not be result-oriented, but rather relationship-oriented. For instance, this could be trying to say something in each call to make the customer smile or laugh or just calling the customer by name.

4. Manage customer expectations.

Customer service is all about expectations. Whether customers are new or returning, it’s likely they will have an impression in mind about the service they will receive. It’s the job of your agents to ensure their expectations are met—and preferably raised.

This is where a good service-level agreement comes in, along with the proper training for your staff so that they know exactly what’s expected of them. This then has to be communicated to your customers, ideally before they even pick up the phone.

5. Align customer service with other business units.

Get out of the mind-set that customer service is a solitary branch of the business, disconnected from marketing, sales, and business development.

Instead, make it your New Year’s resolution to collaborate more with other areas of the business. Customer service can play a huge role in showing where the business is going wrong and where it’s going right.


6. Ensure you have the right mind-set.

It’s easy to slip into the wrong mind-set at work. One trap contact center managers often fall into is thinking of their customer service team as the defense team, in place to fight off angry hordes of customers.

This is particularly true if you’re constantly striving to meet efficiency goals and begin to see unhappy customers as “getting in the way.”

If you’ve felt that your team was leaning that way toward the end of the year, you now have a chance to start fresh. Remind them that it’s not a case of customer versus agent; both agent and customer should want the same thing.

7. Review the metrics you use to measure success.

Contact center managers can often spend months tracking particular metrics, without considering whether what they are measuring is really having a positive impact on customer satisfaction.

One example of this is average handle time. If you put too much emphasis on chasing a low score, it can result in agents slamming the phone down after every call to ensure their personal stats stay low.

This often doesn’t correlate with a rise in customer satisfaction.

8. Consider the training your agents need to tackle the challenges they may face in the new year.

When you review the past year, it’s important to look for areas of weakness, both as a company and as individuals, so that you can plan a training program for the next year.

9. Don’t neglect individual goals.

Your team is made up of individuals, and they all have their own strengths and weaknesses. If you can take the time to understand what each person needs to develop, you can help to motivate them.

10. Say “thank you.”

Sometimes it’s easy to forget the simplest tip of all when it comes to both customer service and management—saying “thank you.”

Look back over the last year. How often did you thank your employees? It’s probably less often than you remember. But saying “thank you” is one of the most important aspects of people management. It helps your team to feel motivated, equipping them with the positivity to handle customer complaints or tough calls in the best way.

It’s also essential to make sure these two words are in your agents’ vocabulary. Just as they need to feel appreciated, your customers do too.

While the nitty-gritty of goals is up to individual contact centers, as long as you focus on motivating staff, providing a clear focus, and setting relationship-oriented goals, there’s no reason you can’t deliver excellent service, call after call. How are you planning to boost customer satisfaction this year?

Article Source “-10 Customer Service Tips for 2015 – CRM Magazine

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Five Ways to Poise Customer Service for the Future



It’s Monday and the first day of Customer Service Week. Let’s begin by setting goals for a long-term strategy to make sure that customer service is one of your company’s competitive differentiators.

I think it’s a fair estimate that a typical customer service representative handles more than 10,000 calls a year. That’s 10,000 interactions, 10,000 opportunities to positively influence the customers’ loyalty toward the brand and the company. There is no other department so uniquely positioned to achieve this goal. The Customer Service Department must take its place on the C Suite level to have the greatest impact.

 Here are five ways Customer Service can demonstrate its value and be a top rung in the organization’s ladder. 

1. Turnover in Customer Service is extremely high. According to Forrester’s analyst, Kate Leggett, having less than a 20 percent turnover for call centers is considered good, with some experiencing over 100 percent. As issues become more complicated and communication instantaneous, organizations must have agents who are competent and well trained with comprehensive information about your company’s products and services.  By definition, this requires longevity.  Representatives should be appreciated and compensated for their expertise. It’s important to include representatives in the decision making process.  They are an integral part of the bottom line profitability.

2. Stakeholders are critical to Customer Service.  Many departments within a company rely on Customer Service to support them with information not easily obtained otherwise. Consider getting feedback from stakeholders to assess their satisfaction levels. Discover additional services that Customer Service can provide to stakeholders to further support their functions. This will result in additional exposure and help secure supplemental budgets for personnel, training and technology.

3. Customers demand a personalized experience. There are new innovations in technology almost daily and multiple products and services from which to choose. Delivering a unique customer experience becomes even more crucial.  Hiring customer service agents with specific skill sets and providing ongoing training is mandatory.  The customer service representative must have the necessary tools to accommodate an individual’s specific needs and requirements.



4. Executives need to walk the talk. Posting letters from C-Level executives highlighting the importance of Customer Service doesn’t mean anything.  Company executives should spend at least a half of a day a year responding to telephone and email inquiries. Feedback should be provided about what they learned from the experience and the processes.  Sending wave files of selected calls won’t achieve the same goal.

5. It’s more than just putting an empty chair in your meetings. Jeff Bezos, from Amazon, placed an empty chair at all meetings; that represented the ”customer.”  This was to keep in the forefront that the customer is central and what would they think of any new ideas suggested.  But is that sufficient?  The person or team in charge of Customer Service should also be in those meetings. That department has the direct connection to the customer. An empty chair can’t talk. Customer Service has its finger on the pulse of what customers want.

Bottom line:  Customer Service is responsible for customers, a company’s most important asset.  Let’s celebrate Customer Service Week by acknowledging both the customer and those who represent them and make sure we give representatives the tools, authority an recognition they well deserve.

Article Source :-Five Ways to Poise Customer Service for the Future

About the author:  Richard Saporito is a NYC Restaurant Insider with more than 30 years experience.  He is currently the President of Topserve Restaurant Consulting, Inc. and the author of “How To Improve Dining Room Service.”  Discover how to improve your restaurant’s dining room service and dramatically increase your profits here:

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This book says everything I have always believed. Its not only the Chef that makes a restaurant successful. The wait staff is also important. Most successful restaurants all have one thing in common…
They provide customer service which exceeds their customer’s expectations!

From the statistics below you will see why its so important
Well, consider these statistics from the White House Office of Consumer Affairs in
Washington, DC…
For every complaint you’re aware of, there are 26 additional customers who
have unresolved problems or complaints…

A dissatisfied customer will tell 9 to 15 people about their displeasure and
sometimes they will tell as many as 20.

On the other hand, this same group also found…
Up to 96% of customers would do business with you again if they felt you acted
quickly and to their satisfaction and many said they would refer other people.

On average, happy customers will tell 4-6 people about their positive experience.

The Fact Is…
Businesses that provide extraordinary customer service can improve their
profitability, increase market share and will have customers who are willing to pay
more for their products and services simply because of the extraordinary service
they receive.

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10 Heartwarming Stories of Remarkable Customer Service 2014



Everyone needs to a dose of customer service inspiration every day. Here are ten heartwarming stories of outstanding customer service performed by businesses who “walk the talk” when it comes to delivering the kind of service that wins a customer over for life. Read on!

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20 Ideas for Restaurant Marketing



Any marketer can tell you that you not only need to find new customers, but you need to increase sales to your current customers … you need them to come back regularly, to bring their loved ones to eat too, to recommend you to their friends, and to spread the word that you serve the Best _______ in Town!
Here are 20 Ideas for Restaurant Marketing that will deepen your relationship with your current customers and help you entice the new ones to keep coming back for more.
Utilize the power, reach and low cost of social media … especially Facebook & Twitter.
1. Today’s Specials: Let your customers know that they can easily find out the daily specials on your facebook page or via twitter … no need to call you and ask. If you have a live facebook and/or twitter stream on your website, then the special will automatically show up there too.
2. Menu Changes: An easy way to let your customers know that you’ve changed things up and keep them in the loop.
3. Chef’s Tips: Become a resource for your customers and help them out in their own kitchen with tips on time-saving, food freshness, food prep, complimentary food combos … whatever your chef can dream up that might be useful information. Have a Weekly Recipe for home cooked meals that you promote via your blog and social media.
4. Social Only Discounts: Reward your customers for interacting with you via social media and offer them exclusive discounts with the proper code that was posted/tweeted. Make sure you put something like: Today Only, This Week, 48 Hours, etc.
5. Online to Offline Social Gatherings: Invite groups from Facebook and Twitter to have real world socials at your restaurant … be sure to get all their facebook names and twitter handles so you can thank them for hanging out at your place afterwards. Be sure you give them one of your social-only discounts too.

 

 

Read the other 15 more ideas here 20 Ideas for Restaurant Marketing

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